Articles Posted in Truck Accidents

With limited visibility for the driver and weighing in at over 20 thousand pounds, the average dump truck can pose a serious hazard to others on the road. Indeed, a Maryland cyclist recently collided with a dump truck. Although this particular truck accident did not claim any lives, reports note that the cyclist required emergency medical care. According to a recent news report, the accident happened on the morning of July 1 when a dump truck allegedly struck a cyclist riding on the northbound side of the Rockville Pike.

As the cyclist heals, Maryland authorities will work to uncover which parties were at fault in the accident. Any party that acted negligently in conjunction with this accident was at least partially at fault. A driver or bicyclist acts negligently when she fails to follow the rules of the road. For example, the cyclist in this accident was almost certainly required to travel with traffic rather than against it. Whether the cyclist was traveling north or south when the accident happened will therefore affect any determination of liability. Establishing liability is critical to determining what compensation is due and to whom.

In a majority of cases where a bike and motor vehicle collide, it is the operator of the motor vehicle who behaved negligently and is therefore at fault. According to one study of bike-car collisions, motorists are at fault in over 80 percent of these types of crashes, whereas cyclists are at fault less than 20 percent of the time. Maryland recognizes the legal concept of contributory negligence, which means that multiple parties in a crash can be held to some degree of fault.

All Maryland truck accidents have the potential to be life-threatening and cause serious bodily harm or death. While some drivers may have the good fortune of escaping a Maryland truck accident with just some scrapes, many others may find themselves significantly injured, in the hospital, or even fighting for their lives. Unfortunately, these accidents are more common than many people realize. Across the state, truck accidents claim the lives of far too many Maryland residents.

Tragically, these truck accidents can happen even when someone is in a vehicle that is supposed to bring them to safety: an ambulance. Just like other vehicles, ambulances share the road with trucks, and they often are driving very fast, trying to get an injured occupant to the hospital safely. Tragedy might strike, then, if an ambulance and a truck get into an accident. For example, just recently, a major crash between a dump truck and an ambulance left two people dead and others injured. According to a local news report that covered the accident, the crash occurred around 10:20 one Tuesday morning when an ambulance driving southbound was t-boned by a dump truck in the passenger side. The driver of the ambulance, a 28-year-old woman, and the driver of the truck, a 67-year-old man, were both taken to local hospitals with life-threatening injuries. Fortunately, both survived. Not so lucky were the two passengers of the ambulance: a 17-year-old boy and a 51-year-old male paramedic were both killed in the crash.

This accident highlights how tragic Maryland truck accidents can be, especially when they involve an emergency vehicle such as an ambulance. Maryland residents want to feel that when they call an ambulance because of an emergency, they can trust the ambulance will take them safely to help. While this is true for the vast majority of cases, Maryland residents must remember that ambulances travel on the same roads as every other vehicle and are still susceptible to car and truck accidents. After these accidents, those involved likely will want to know if and how they can recover against the negligent driver. Can they sue for monetary damages? How much can they get? How does their being in an ambulance complicate their recovery? With these questions, Maryland truck accident victims should read out to a personal injury attorney knowledgeable in this area of the law. While some may be tempted to file their lawsuit themselves, in an attempt to save costs, they may find themselves completely barred from recovery because they did not know how to file properly or because they had trouble understanding how exactly to bring a case of this nature to trial. Working with an experienced attorney, who is not paid unless you are, can help ensure maximum chances for success at recovery.

Everyone who has ever driven on a highway in Maryland knows that the cars there share the road with many different trucks and buses. Maryland highways are common along the routes for truck drivers, which unfortunately means that they see more than their fair share of Maryland truck accidents. While most people who think about Maryland truck accidents think about semi-trucks driven by experienced truck drivers, an accident may be even more likely when an individual who does not usually drive a truck rents and drives one while they are moving, for example.

For example, take a recent crash that occurred earlier this month. As reported by a local news organization, a large moving truck attempted to make a U-turn when it got stuck. The driver hit the gas in an attempt to get the truck unstuck but unfortunately lost control of the vehicle. The moving truck struck two cars and was on its way to collide with a pickup truck when, fortunately, the man on the back of the pickup truck saw the truck coming and jumped out of the way with moments to spare. He saw the moving truck hit his pickup truck and was grateful that he avoided what would have likely been a fatal crash. Fortunately, no one was killed in this accident.

This truck accident illustrates the risks posed by moving trucks or other rental trucks. While truck accidents are already far too common in Maryland, most truck drivers have years of experience driving large vehicles and understand how to operate something that size on the road. In contrast, individuals driving rental moving trucks may have extremely limited experience driving large vehicles and may find themselves unable to control the vehicle, to successfully make a U-turn or something else of that sort. Unfortunately, this may make them a risk to other drivers on the highways.

Like any other driver, when a Maryland truck driver hits the road, they are expected to drive carefully, or to exercise “reasonable care.” The standard of reasonable care extends even to emergency situations. This means that when a truck driver encounters an emergency on the road, such as a Maryland truck accident, the truck driver must still exercise reasonable care. However, this standard considers the circumstances the driver is presented with and the amount of time the driver has to react.

In a Maryland accident case, a plaintiff has to show that a defendant failed to meet the standard of care. In Maryland, if a truck driver suddenly finds himself in a dangerous situation, the driver is not expected to exercise the same degree of care as a driver who has sufficient time to evaluate his or her options and decide what to do. But the driver is expected to exercise reasonable care for his or her own safety and for the safety of others. This doctrine is known as the sudden emergency doctrine. However, the truck driver cannot benefit from the doctrine if the driver is the one who caused the emergency or if the driver is not actually in a dangerous situation. So, if a truck driver damages another person or property in an emergency situation, the question is, when the truck driver was presented with the emergency, did the truck driver exercise the degree of care that a reasonable, prudent person would, given the circumstances? A jury or a judge will also take into consideration the amount of time the driver had to react and evaluate the choices. Failing to take reasonable care under the circumstances may make the driver liable for resulting damages.

Six People Killed in Crash Involving Over 100 Vehicles

One of the best things about traveling via train or bus is having someone else drive and operate the vehicle while the passengers relax, read, sleep, or even get some work done. For this reason, many Maryland residents may rely on these modes of transportation weekly or even daily, to travel within and outside of the state or to get to work. But while the flexibility and ease of these forms of transportation are nice, passengers should remember that there is still the risk of a Maryland traffic accident. And when a bus or a train hits a truck, the accident can be catastrophic and maybe even fatal.

For example, take a recent truck accident involving an Amtrak train. According to a news report covering the crash, the accident happened around 4:30 PM one afternoon when a truck stopped inexplicably on the train tracks. Amtrak crew members aboard the train told investigators that as the train approached the truck, they blew the horn several times. The train was traveling at high speed, and unable to stop, so it hit the truck, causing a significant crash. The driver of the truck was pronounced dead at the scene. The investigation is ongoing, and at this point, it is not clear why the truck driver did not move off of the tracks to avoid getting hit by the train.

It’s not clear from the news report how many others were injured, but in such a serious crash, there is clear potential to cause harm to the train passengers as well as the truck driver. Injured passengers in situations such as this one—in which the train or bus they are riding crashes into a truck—may not think that they have the right to file a personal injury lawsuit and may believe that the train or bus company is the one to handle that. But Maryland state law makes clear that anyone injured in Maryland truck accidents can file a personal injury lawsuit to try and recover for their accidents.

Maryland truck accidents can be incredibly destructive, hurting vehicles, property, and of course, people. Because trucks are much larger than most other vehicles on the road, an accident involving one may be particularly dangerous. As in other accidents, Maryland state law allows those injured in Maryland truck accidents to file a personal injury lawsuit against the negligent driver to recover. However, it is important to note how these truck accidents may differ from other accidents, including car and motorcycle accidents. Unlike cars and motorcycles, most individuals do not drive trucks as their primary form of personal transportation. Instead, most truck drivers are driving for work, and are employed by a third party. Thus, a legal doctrine called vicarious liability, which may allow injured accident victims to sue a truck driver’s employer as well as the driver themselves, is especially relevant in these cases.

To illustrate the point, let’s use a real-life truck accident that occurred just last week. According to a local news report, one truck was passing by another parked truck when the passenger side mirror struck the second truck. Immediately afterward, a pedestrian—a 58-year-old man—was then struck by the moving truck as well. While the accident is still under investigation, let’s suppose for a moment that the driver of the first truck was negligent in some way—perhaps they were distracted while driving, leading to the incident. The injured man may want to file a personal injury lawsuit against him. These suits can cover hospital bills, past and future medical expenses, lost wages, and pain and suffering.

Now let’s suppose that the injured victim—the plaintiff—incurred $100,000 in total costs as a result of this accident. It may be that the truck driver—the defendant—does not have sufficient funds to cover these costs. So, the plaintiff in this case may want to file suit against the defendant’s employer, for whom the defendant was driving the truck. Depending on the case and the nature of the employment, the plaintiff may be able to recover from the employer as well, even though they were not actually present at the time of the crash. This is known as the doctrine of vicarious liability—holding the employer vicariously liable for something negligent their employee did while on the job.

When someone drives carelessly, ignoring traffic laws, or running through red lights, they most likely know that they are being risky and that there is a risk of getting into a car or truck accident. Tragically, careless driving causes fatal Maryland car and truck accidents all the time. However, these accidents affect far more than just the at-fault driver, especially when large commercial trucks are involved. Oftentimes, Maryland truck accidents involve several vehicles because one vehicle crashing into another can set off a chain reaction.

For an example of a recent multi-vehicle crash, take a recent accident from late September. According to a local news report covering the incident, the crash occurred around 11:30 in the morning. An 80-year-old man driving on the highway attempted a left turn when a dump truck hit his van from behind, pushing it into oncoming traffic. The van then collided head-first with another truck, and then was pushed partially into another lane of traffic, where a motor home hit it. Tragically, the 80-year-old van driver was killed, pronounced dead at the scene by responding officials. The drivers of the other vehicles were reported to have minor injuries. As a result of the accident, the highway was closed for two hours.

This crash, which involved four vehicles, is a tragic example of how dangerous one incorrect driving maneuver can turn out to be. While the accident is still under investigation and it is unclear exactly who was at fault, it is important for Maryland residents to remember that if they are injured in an accident such as this one, they may have a claim against whoever was responsible.

Generally, after someone is injured in a Maryland truck accident, they will first look to hold the other drivers involved in the accident responsible. However, in accidents involving a single vehicle or even in crashes involving multiple vehicles, state or local governments may also have some liability based on their responsibility to maintain the roadway, particularly in cases involving intersections or other conditions in the roadway that are known to be dangerous.

State and local governments are responsible for keeping roads in a reasonably safe condition for everyone traveling on the road. In a case based on a dangerous condition on a roadway, the plaintiff generally must show that there was a dangerous condition that existed, that the government knew or should have known about the dangerous condition, that the government knew about the condition for long enough to address the condition or warn the plaintiff, that the government had a duty to act, and that the government’s failure to act caused the plaintiff’s injuries.

In some cases, a government may be immune from liability depending on the circumstances of the case. However, in Maryland, state and local governments generally can be held responsible if there is a dangerous condition on the roadway and if they had actual or constructive notice of the dangerous condition and failed to properly address it. In these circumstances, injured persons normally can file suit against the government for its failure to maintain roads in a reasonably safe condition.

Earlier this month, a truck accident shut down a major road, sending several motorists to the hospital with injuries, highlighting the dangers that Maryland truck accidents pose to motorists. While it’s true that any vehicle can cause an accident—from small bicycles to large semi-trucks—accidents involving trucks tend to be some of the most catastrophic because of the sheer size of a truck. This is especially true when a truck driver loses control and swerve off the road or into other lanes, as illustrated by a recent crash.

According to a local news report covering an incident from early this month, a crash occurred just before 6 a.m. on a Tuesday morning, when a semi-truck traveling south on the highway hit a Buick Lacross that was parked on the road’s right shoulder. The collision caused the truck to lose control. As the truck swerved out of control, it ended up going up the highway’s embankment where it crashed into a pedestrian bridge. The pedestrian bridge suffered structural damages as a result, but thankfully, no pedestrians were on the bridge at the time. The driver of the truck, as well as the driver of the Buick, were taken to a nearby hospital with injuries following the accident.

Sometimes, in accidents such as this one, it may be difficult to initially determine which party was at fault. Those injured in Maryland truck accidents might not know how to prove the other party caused the accident, and may never consider bringing a personal injury suit. However, most accidents are preventable. Often, there is one or more negligent parties who can be held responsible for an accident victim’s injuries.

Public transit is becoming increasingly popular in Maryland and across the United States. Public transportation options such as buses, trains, and subways allow people to travel relatively quickly and inexpensively, and is better for the environment than driving an individual car. However, just like any form of transportation, accidents can occur on public transit, and can lead to severe injuries or even death. In some cases, Maryland public transit accidents may be even more dangerous, because of the number of people in a vehicle.

For example, recently a bus crash made headlines when multiple people were injured. According to a local news report covering the collision, a bus was driving along its normal route when a tow truck driver allegedly lost control of the vehicle. The bus driver swerved out of the way to avoid an accident with the tow truck, but in doing so caused the bus to crash into a building. Fortunately, no one was killed, but six individuals were injured and had to be hospitalized after the crash.

The crash illustrates that no vehicle is immune from getting into a Maryland traffic accident. In the aftermath of an accident such as the one above, it can be difficult for injury victims to understand how the accident occurred, who is at fault, and whether or not they have a path to recovery.

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