Articles Posted in Truck Accidents

Hazardous materials, when spilled due to truck accidents, can cause major damage, health risks, clean-up and time. The U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration developed a report titled “Traffic incident management in Hazardous Materials Spills in Incident Clearance”, the report indicates that clean-up of hazardous spills can be a major source of delay in clearing traffic incidents, and is typically expensive. The report categorizes spills into different areas: vehicular fluids, hazardous material cargoes, or a combination of both. Vehicular fluid spills involve materials that are used in a vehicle’s operations, such as fuel, radiator cooler, transmission fluid, brake fluid, hydraulic fluid, windshield wiper fluid, and battery acid. A hazardous materials cargo spill is a release of a substance or material capable of posing an unreasonable risk to health, safety, or property when transported for commercial purposes.

According to a recent news report, a tractor-trailer crashed across both sides of Interstate 95 in Baltimore County, Maryland. The accident involved six vehicles in total. The driver of the tractor-trailer and one of the other vehicles were taken to a local hospital for treatment of their injuries. The tractor-trailer overturned, which resulted in saddle tanks leaking fuel. A hazmat team was called to the scene.

Accidents Involving Hazardous Materials

On a typical road or highway, vehicles of all varying sizes can be seen traveling throughout. Drivers share the road with smaller sedans, medium-sized sedans, larger sedans, trucks ranging in size and type, bicyclists, and pedestrians. A common type of truck seen on the road, a semi-trailer truck, includes a combination of a tractor unit and at least one semi-trailer to carry freight. Semi-trucks can range in size, but the standard dimensions are 48 to 53 feet in length, 8.5 feet in height, and 13.5 feet in height. According to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, in 2020, truck tractors pulling a single semi-trailer accounted for 53 percent of the large trucks involved in fatal crashes in 2020, while tractors pulling two trailers made up 3 percent of the large trucks involved in fatal crashes.

According to a recent news report from Michigan, a collision involving a semi-truck resulted in the death of one man. A semi-truck was hauling large stones and heading east when the driver failed to stop at an intersection, hitting a car headed south. The man driving the car was pronounced dead at the scene, and the semi-truck driver was taken to a local hospital for injuries. An investigation into the accident is still ongoing.

What Are the Most Common Causes of Semi-Truck Accidents?

Although accidents can happen for a variety of reasons, there are three critical events according to the large truck crash causation study conducted by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration from 2007. The first critical event assigned to large trucks is running out of the travel lane, either into another lane or off the road. The second critical event assigned to large trucks is vehicle loss of control due to traveling too fast for conditions, cargo shift, vehicle systems failure, poor road conditions, or other reasons. The last critical event is colliding with the rear end of another vehicle in the truck’s travel lane. Drivers of large trucks especially should take care to avoid any distractions while driving, should ensure that they pack cargo properly and safely, and take care to nsure that they remain alert during trips, and adhere to road rules, including speed.

Every year, about two percent of motor vehicle collision deaths are attributed to bicyclists. These bicyclists often share the road with larger vehicles, including heavy trucks like commercial trucks and dump trucks. Despite the relative size of these vehicles on the road, heavy truck drivers still owe bicyclists all the care and consideration when driving that they owe other, larger forms of transportation like passenger cars. Even so, truck drivers often forget to look for smaller vehicles and bicycles when sharing the road. This can be particularly devastating in the event of a collision because of the relative sizes of vehicles and the protections they afford. If this lack of care causes an accident, it may lead to a personal injury lawsuit.

According to a recent report, a bicyclist died of crash-related injuries 10 hours after they were struck by a dump truck driver. Witnesses to the scene say the driver and bicyclist were traveling side by side when the truck took a left, hitting the bicyclist. One witness said the truck driver wasn’t looking before turning, leading to the bicyclist’s death. The accident remains under investigation, and police have not determined who is liable for the accident.

Responsible drivers owe each other the bare minimum of looking before making a turn. Bike lanes often run next to traffic, meaning drivers should be aware of the possibility of a bicyclist riding next to them, especially when trying to turn. In Maryland, drivers, including truck drivers, are responsible for using reasonable care when operating a vehicle, including truck drivers. When truck drivers breach this duty of care, the victim or the victim’s family could bring a personal injury claim.

Truck accidents are often devastating when compared to accidents that take place between just passenger vehicles. This is often because when a truck is involved in an accident, it is usually larger in size, heavier in weight, and harder to control by the truck driver when compared to a passenger vehicle. This often results in an increased chance of property damage, significant injuries, or death to those involved.

According to a recent news report, an accident involving a U-Haul truck and a state department of transportation safety vehicle resulted in a serious accident. The state transportation safety vehicle was present on the road at the time to keep workers working on construction nearby safe. Based on an initial investigation, local authorities believe that the driver of the U-Haul was distracted in the moments before it crashed into a safety vehicle. As the accident remains under investigation, it remains unclear whether anyone was injured in the accident or if any charges will be filed.

Who should I consider as defendants in a truck accident case?

Following a truck accident, it can often be a confusing and complicated situation figuring out who exactly to bring a personal injury lawsuit against. Although your first instinct may be to sue the truck driver as an individual, it may actually be more strategic to also sue the company that employed the truck driver or even the manufacturer of the vehicle itself. Who you bring suit against ultimately depends on specific circumstances surrounding your collision and how it took place. Sometimes, potential plaintiffs are advised to sue more than just the truck driver as an individual, because the truck driver may not have much to offer the potential plaintiffs in terms of compensation. Other times, bringing the truck company that employs the truck driver is essential to the case because the company has agreed to indemnify, or be responsible for, the truck driver’s actions.

Because trucks are often the largest and heaviest vehicle on the road, they are also frequently involved in devastating accidents. If you are the driver of a smaller passenger vehicle, or even an SUV, you may have actively attempted to avoid or pass trucks on the road for fear of getting into an unexpected accident. These fears are unsurprising. After all, trucks are involved in thousands of accidents that result in significant injuries and fatalities each year for a variety of reasons.

According to a recent local news report, a man died after a tractor-trailer accident. Troopers on the scene reported that the driver of the tractor-trailer ran a red light and turned into an intersection, which caused him to crash into two vehicles that had the right of way. One of the vehicles that was struck, a Jeep, was hit on its right fender after it swerved but was able to get out of the way. The second vehicle, a Chrysler, was struck on the left side and swung off the side of the road. The driver of the Chrysler was transported to a local hospital, where he died from his injuries. The accident is still being looked into by local authorities and Maryland State Police Crash Team investigators.

Because trucks are so heavy and take up so much space, many people may not be adequately trained to properly drive or operate them. Truck drivers have to operate their vehicles with additional care, especially because trucks can often take up more space, move at faster speeds, and require the control and dexterity of an experienced driver to avoid an accident or tipping over when turning. Truck drivers also have to be good at ascertaining risk when exiting shopping centers or parking lots, since it takes longer for the entire length of the vehicle to make it onto the road and join the front of the truck. If timed incorrectly at a busy intersection, this could cause a major pile-up.

Every year across the country, thousands of people are killed in fatal accidents. Truck accidents, however, make up nearly twice the percentage of total fatal accidents. Because trucks are often the largest, heaviest, and most difficult vehicles to navigate on the road, this should be no surprise to even the most experienced of drivers. Following a major truck accident, you may have suffered from significant injuries or property damage. Figuring out what your next steps are and what options you have legally is crucial to recovering the compensation you deserve.

According to a recent news report, an EMT was killed following a devastating accident involving a semi-truck and an ambulance. Local authorities reported that firefighter EMTs were in an ambulance traveling to respond to a 911 call when they attempted to make a left turn. While making the turn, the ambulance crossed into the road’s southbound lanes, where they collided with a semi-truck heading north. Video from the accident showed that the cab of the ambulance was sheared off from the rest of the vehicle and that the semi-truck was hauling dirt or gravel. The accident remains under investigation as local authorities continue to look into who was at fault in the collision.

Who Is Liable in a Maryland Truck Accident?

After Maryland truck accident, it often may not be clear who exactly you can sue to hold liable for compensation. Figuring out who you can sue often depends on the circumstances surrounding how the accident took place. For example, if the truck driver was distracted, speeding, or drowsy, it is more likely that they are liable for the accident. On the other hand, if the driver was an employee of a trucking company forcing them to meet prohibitively tight deadlines or the company failed to keep up with mechanical maintenance of the truck that caused the accident, the trucking company could be liable instead.

Although various types of car accidents can result in significant injury and property damage, collisions involving trucks are often among the most devastating. Because large trucks like 18 wheelers and other large commercial vehicles often dominate the road in size and weight, collisions involving a truck can significantly increase the likelihood of serious injuries, death, and property damage. Following a major truck accident, it is crucial that you remain calm and take the proper steps to recover from the collision.

According to a recent news report, six children were injured and a teenage boy died following a major tractor-trailer accident. Local officials reported that a tractor-trailer crashed into a car, which resulted in serious and minor injuries as well as multiple individuals transferred to local hospitals for treatment. The teenager was in the car with two other adults and several children when it was hit by the truck, and the teen was pronounced dead at the hospital. The truck driver also suffered minor injuries following the accident. The collision remains under investigation by local authorities.

Following a major truck accident, the first thing collision victims should do is ensure that if anyone needs medical attention, an ambulance and local authorities are called. Any subsequent hospital visits, scans, physical therapy, or medical care should be extensively documented so that you have a chance to be compensated for it.

Sometimes, even the most careful and safe drivers experience unavoidable risks while on the road. After all, there is only so much a safe driver can do if others are negligent when operating their vehicles. Although negligence from other drivers can take on many forms, one of the most dangerous is when a driver’s negligence leaves obstacles or hazards on the road that are not immediately clear to drivers in oncoming traffic. Because this negligence can lead to often fatal accidents and consequences, those who are responsible must be held accountable.

According to a recent news report, a fatal tow truck accident left a mother of four dead and several others severely injured. Local authorities reported that the driver of a flatbed tow truck experienced a mechanical issue and stopped in the right lane of the interstate. The tow truck driver ended up getting a ride from someone else and abandoned his vehicle where it had stopped. Officials also reported that the tow truck driver, at the time that he was driving, was operating his vehicle on a suspended license. Later, a separate driver crashed into the abandoned tow truck, which killed his wife and severely injured both his 14 and nine-year-old daughters. Following the crash, both vehicles came to rest in a ditch. The accident remains under investigation.

Although unexpected emergencies can take place without warning, safety officials recommend that drivers pull onto the shoulder when their vehicle comes to a stop. Rather than simply stopping in a lane with active traffic when your vehicle experiences low gas, a flat tire, or other mechanical issues, it is best to get off the active road to keep yourself and others safe.

The person behind the wheel when a crash occurs is often looked at first as the party at fault. However, in some accidents, the driver does not bear any blame. A car may have a defect due to a manufacturing or design defect or because of a faulty repair. In the case of a faulty repair of a truck or other vehicle, the repair shop may be liable for negligence through filing a Maryland negligence claim.

In a Maryland negligence claim, a plaintiff must prove that the defendant owed the plaintiff a duty of care, that the defendant failed to meet the degree of care by required acting or failing to act in some way, that the plaintiff suffered damages because of the wrongful act, and that the defendant’s wrongful act caused the plaintiff damages. A plaintiff has to demonstrate that it was more likely than not that the damages were caused by the defendant’s wrongful conduct.

A repair shop may be liable for negligence if the repair shop was responsible for repairing a vehicle, failed to make the necessary repairs, the plaintiff suffered damages because of the repair shop’s faulty repair, and the plaintiff suffered actual damages. A repair shop may claim that the repair was completed according to expected professional standards or that an accident was caused by another issue. Plaintiffs in a successful negligence claim may be able to recover financial compensation including medical expenses, property damages, lost wages, and emotional suffering.

With limited visibility for the driver and weighing in at over 20 thousand pounds, the average dump truck can pose a serious hazard to others on the road. Indeed, a Maryland cyclist recently collided with a dump truck. Although this particular truck accident did not claim any lives, reports note that the cyclist required emergency medical care. According to a recent news report, the accident happened on the morning of July 1 when a dump truck allegedly struck a cyclist riding on the northbound side of the Rockville Pike.

As the cyclist heals, Maryland authorities will work to uncover which parties were at fault in the accident. Any party that acted negligently in conjunction with this accident was at least partially at fault. A driver or bicyclist acts negligently when she fails to follow the rules of the road. For example, the cyclist in this accident was almost certainly required to travel with traffic rather than against it. Whether the cyclist was traveling north or south when the accident happened will therefore affect any determination of liability. Establishing liability is critical to determining what compensation is due and to whom.

In a majority of cases where a bike and motor vehicle collide, it is the operator of the motor vehicle who behaved negligently and is therefore at fault. According to one study of bike-car collisions, motorists are at fault in over 80 percent of these types of crashes, whereas cyclists are at fault less than 20 percent of the time. Maryland recognizes the legal concept of contributory negligence, which means that multiple parties in a crash can be held to some degree of fault.

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